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On The Road (Man and His Mountain) #201675

CBS Evening News for Thursday, Dec 18, 1969
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(Studio) South Dakota man tries to reshape mount
REPORTER: Walter Cronkite

(Near Custer, South Dakota) worked 20 years so far on giant sculpture of Sioux leader, Crazy Horse. No government help. Does it all himself. [Sculptor Korczak ZIOLKOWSKI%- cites thousands of tons of rocks he's moved off mount three million tons to go. Describes dimensions.] Monument is three times as big as Pyramids, taller than Washington Monument, and wider than length of two football fields,. Hope University for American Indians will be placed below it. His children help out. [ZIOLKOWSKI - praises children's work. It can be done.] Other sculptures shown. Charles Kuralt, sculptor, his wife, and 10 children eat dinner. [ZIOLKOWSKI - says his answer to world's question, "Did he do the job?" is yes. Ifs and excuses no good.] He lives by Goethe quotation on action.
REPORTER: Charles Kuralt

Reporter(s):
Cronkite, Walter;
Kuralt, Charles
Duration:
00:05:20

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