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Military Spying On Civilians #212670

CBS Evening News for Friday, Jan 01, 1971
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(Studio) Defense Secretary Laird issued directive designed to strengthen his control over military intelligence activities. Action taken after charges that Army intelligence agents had conducted political surveillance of civilian officials. Film shows interview with "former agent `X'". Agent says he posed as demonstrator to report on crowd size, activities, and leaders.
REPORTER: Charles Collingwood

(Minneapolis, Minnesota ) Interviews with several former agents tell of surveillance of Senator Charles Goodell and John K. Galbraith. [Former agent Richard CASSON - says military intelligence and local police exchanged, and compared pictures of demonstrations.] [Vice President student affairs at University of Minnesota Dr. Paul CASHMAN - says no authorization for University police to work with military intelligence, any such operation outside University policy in his judgment.] Casson assigned to interrogate foreign students, pressure them into lie detector tests with questions about political views, sex habits. [CASSON - says those who balked when pressured were told failure to submit to test would raise questions as to suitability for security clearance.] Phony press cards used at demonstrations. "Former agent `Y'" tells of low quality pictures developed at local drugstore.
REPORTER: John Kelley

Reporter(s):
Collingwood, Charles;
Kelley, John
Duration:
00:04:50

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