Search the Archive

New Lie Detector / Psychological Stress Evaluator #241623

CBS Evening News for Tuesday, Aug 26, 1975
View other clips in this broadcast →

Material supplied by VTNA may be used for educational analysis or research only. Any editing, reproduction, publication, rebroadcast, public showing or public display may be prohibited by copyright laws.

(Studio) Report on lie detector, P. S. E.
REPORTER: Roger Mudd

(DC) Lie detector measures stress in voice. Parts of Goodson-Todman show "To Tell The Truth" shown. Voice of Lee Harvey Oswald examined. Oswald shown. [P. S. E. analysist Michael KRADZ - interprets stress of Oswald.] P. S. E. used to test voices of public figures like Senator Edward Kennedy and Patricia Hearst. Rptd. Shah of Iran tests loyalty of guards with it.
REPORTER: Lesley Stahl

(Raleigh, North Carolina) Police use P. S. E. as investigative tool.
REPORTER: Lesley Stahl

(Baltimore, Maryland) Barbeque chef Riley Brooks released from life sentence due to P. S. E. test. [BROOKS - says got my freedom.] P. S. E. accepted in California and Maryland court cases. Michigan outlawed it unless used with polygraph. 4 fed. agencies, incling. CIA, find it reliable. Mfr. offers mandatory training course. [KRADZ - teaches about P. S. E.] American Polygraph Association says 3 days inadequate. ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) has called for polygraph ban as 5th amendment violation. Says P. S. E. more dangerous. [ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) spokesperson Hope EASTMAN - says users won't know judgements being made.] [P. S. E. inventor Allan BELL - says you have right to see if I'm telling truth.]
REPORTER: Lesley Stahl

Reporter(s):
Mudd, Roger;
Stahl, Lesley
Duration:
00:04:50

Note to sponsor members: The Vanderbilt Television News Archive video player requires a modern operating system and browser to work properly. If you are experiencing playback problems, check the minimum requirements and adjust your setup accordingly. After adjustments, if you continue to experience problems, please contact us.

Welcome! Above is the abstract of the item that you're interested in viewing from the Vanderbilt Television News Archive's collection. You have three options if you'd like to view this item:

  • You may request a loan of this video by registering on our website and placing an order.
  • You may visit the Television News Archive on the Vanderbilt campus to view on-site from the Archive's collection.
  • If you are associated with a college or university, you may ask your library if they would like to become a sponsor, which would give students and faculty at your institution the ability to view items from our collection.

If you believe that you are associated with a sponsoring college or university and have received this message in error, please let us know.