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Crime / Elderly Victims #243387

CBS Evening News for Tuesday, Nov 16, 1976
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(Studio) Most susceptible to crime are elderly; police now trying new methods of protecting elderly from criminals.
REPORTER: Walter Cronkite

(NYC) [Mrs. Pattie POLITE - says she is robbery victim.] [Mrs. Molly LORBER - says she was mugged and is afraid to go out.] Police say high crime rate against elderly is result of people's fear of rpting. incidents. In NYC, elderly of 1 hsing. project meet with police to learn how to protect themselves. [Mrs. Rita REGALES - says even in daytime she doesn't go out.] [POLITE - says she's really frightened.] New methods of fighting crime against elderly noted. NYPD mbr., sergeant James Bolte heads 1 special robbery unit; says he thinks much of such crime done by teenagers. [BOLTE - says teenagers have said for easy money, pick old person.) New York laws next year will begin crackdown on juvenile and youth crime not permitted before; case of Ronald Timmons noted. State senate Ralph Marino comments on law which presently forbids revealing juvenile records to judge setting bail. [MARINO - says his suggestion is to deal with more serious felons in adult court instead of letting them go.] Officials say tougher laws and more psychiatric care not enough. [New York division for youth spokesperson Peter EDELMAN - says youth's problems as victims of own lifestyle need to be thought of as well.] Police advisories to old people for protecting themselves noted.
REPORTER: David Culhane

Reporter(s):
Cronkite, Walter;
Culhane, David
Duration:
00:05:20

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