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Campaign 1976 / Massachusetts Primary / Poll / Issues #245131

CBS Evening News for Wednesday, Mar 03, 1976
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(Studio) Report on Massachusetts primary results.
REPORTER: Walter Cronkite

(Boston, Massachusetts) Wallace didn't ride his antibusing horse to victory. Udall didn't knock Bayh out of race; Bayh knocked self out. Carter not as popular for his honesty here. Shriver bombed in Massachusetts. Jackson's strong finish surprised many. Wallace and Carter must share Florida with Jackson.
REPORTER: Roger Mudd

(Studio) Report on "CBS-New York Times" poll of Massachusetts voters.
REPORTER: Walter Cronkite

(New York) Most important issues to Massachusetts voters: balanced budget, job guarantees, state control domestic programs and power of big business Massachusetts unemployment is 11.8%; national average is 7.8%. Lower-ranking issues: environment, welfare, busing and defense spending. Least important issues: crime and drug abuse, detente and abortion. 1/3 of those who voted for Wallace did so because of busing but issue not important to major voters. Abortion not considered important issue either. 65% voters trust government leaders sometimes, 11% most times and 8% never. 22% would have voted for Senator Hubert H. Humphrey if he'd been on ballot. 33% would have voted for Senator Edward Kennedy; 41% said no.
REPORTER: David Culhane

Reporter(s):
Cronkite, Walter;
Culhane, David;
Mudd, Roger
Duration:
00:04:00

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