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Drug Traffic #248743

CBS Evening News for Monday, Jan 31, 1977
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(Studio) New Jersey doctor today sentenced to prison for selling dangerous drugs; case of Dr. Joseph Bonaccorsi not unique.
REPORTER: Walter Cronkite

(Millville, New Jersey) Physicians, not just pushers in streets, are also drug dealers. (New Jersey police film shown; is conversation of police undercover agent with Dr. Bonaccorsi of Vineland, New Jersey.) [INFORMANT and BONACCORSI-discuss drug deal.] [New Jersey attorney general William HYLAND - says it's becoming clear that traffic in legal drugs for illegal use is as much problem as traffic in heroin and cocaine.] [Drug ADDICT - says he can walk into doctor's office and get drugs.] Addicts say they can score with 1 in 10 physicians. Barbiturates, amphetamines and tranquilizers are among those used. Drug Enforcement Admin. says more than 1/2 pills obtained illegally each year are supplied by physicians and druggists. [Med. Examiners Board spokesperson Dr. Edwin ALBANO - says doctors do it to make money easily.] Case of Florida physician noted. [New Jersey division of criminal justice spokesperson Robert WEIR - says Hippocratic Oath is sometimes hypocritical.] Rpting. team followed New Jersey investigative unit last month by permission, to stake-out of office of Dr. Peter Penico of Millville; details noted. State recs. federal funds to aid investigation; arrests over 2 years have had 100% conviction rate. [ALBANO - says penalties for doctors, street pushers should be same.] Physicians rarely go to jail and some retain licenses only to begin practice again and resume selling drugs illegally.
REPORTER: Steve Young

Reporter(s):
Cronkite, Walter;
Young, Steve
Duration:
00:05:30

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