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Carter / Urban Rehabilitation / Flood Control #248905

CBS Evening News for Wednesday, Oct 12, 1977
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(Studio) President Carter signs bill with regard to urban rehabilitation; details noted. (Film shown.) President expresses reservations about one section of law, Eagleton amendment, which removes restrictions on construction of hses. in flood-prone areas; provision cuts out limits on building in such areas, designed to cut money paid each year in flood relief.
REPORTER: Walter Cronkite

(Cassville, Missouri) Cassville, Missouri, is small town with no worries about major flooding; small part of it had been designated flood plain due to minor flooding, but there's never been major one here. City's battle with fed. government began when US Housing and Urban Development declared about half town as flood plain, include downtown and most of industry area. Under regulations, development couldn't be financed by federally insured banks, savings and loan assns. or SBA. Town is relieved by today's bill signing. [Real estate agent Lige FROST - says flood plain designation would have meant disaster.] [City attorney Joe ELLIS - feels no flood could be as devastating as program envisions.] [BANKER - doesn't feel federal government should be in position to tell banks and loan assns. to whom they can loan money.] Amend. is of concern to envts. worried about flood control. [Envtl. Policy Center spokesperson Brent BLACKWELDER - says it means unscrupulous developers could convince towns to drop out of program and develop area, then in few years it might be ruined by flood without hope of federal aid.] Bill allows towns to make own decisions with regard to flood plain area.
REPORTER: Don Webster

Reporter(s):
Cronkite, Walter;
Webster, Don
Duration:
00:03:00

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