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Health / Chemical Testing Controversy / Cancer #249922

CBS Evening News for Friday, Dec 16, 1977
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(Studio) Recent health concerns about chemicals in such substances as saccharin and hair dyes, in relation to cancer, noted. Controversy's effect on scientists' determination with regard to safety of chemicals reported.
REPORTER: Walter Cronkite

(NYC) Details given with regard to scientists' testing procedures on animals in testing for cancer-causing agents noted; is one of biggest controversies with regard to such tests. [American Cancer Society spokesperson Dr. E. Cuyler HAMMOND - cites dispute with National Cancer Institute method of testing animals with regard to hair dye and agreement with statement of National Academy of Sciences committee with regard to testing on animals.] [National Cancer Institute director Dr. Arthur UPTON - defends rationale with regard to high dosages given to animals. Notes evidence that for some chemicals there may be no safe threshold of use.] [HAMMOND - would have no qualms about use of hair dye for self.] Argument of proponents of this type of animal testing cited.
REPORTER: Richard Wagner

(Studio) Report on unnamed flu strain, once found in US, now showing up in USSR and Hong Kong. United States health officials' statements on it noted.
REPORTER: Walter Cronkite

Reporter(s):
Cronkite, Walter;
Wagner, Richard
Duration:
00:03:30

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