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Bonestell / Space Paintings #251623

CBS Evening News for Friday, Apr 22, 1977
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(Studio) Viking operation on Mars shuts down for Martian winter; however, another heavens-watcher conts. work.
REPORTER: Roger Mudd

(Monterey Peninsula, California) Report on art of Chesley Bonestell, who's painted many pictures of imagined views of Saturn, Mars, Pluto and others. Paintings are in places like Boston Science Museum, Smithsonian Institution Air and Space Museum in DC, Adler Planetarium in Chicago and in libraries where his illustrations appear in books and mags., like "Collier's." Bonestell's 1st Saturn painting was destroyed in San Francisco earthquake in 1906. In 90th year, Bonestell still works. He says he's been moved by only 1 space picture, a black and white television image in 1969. [BONESTELL - says 1st step on moon made him feel very emotional.] He and wife walk along beach at house on Pacific Ocean. [BONESTELL - talks of things human brain can't comprehend, life, death, infinity, power to move one's body.]
REPORTER: Charles Osgood

Reporter(s):
Mudd, Roger;
Osgood, Charles
Duration:
00:03:20

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