Search the Archive

Concorde / United States Landing Rights #254290

CBS Evening News for Friday, Sep 23, 1977
View other clips in this broadcast →

Material supplied by VTNA may be used for educational analysis or research only. Any editing, reproduction, publication, rebroadcast, public showing or public display may be prohibited by copyright laws.

(Studio) Carter administration proposes expanded landing rights for Concorde, but there will 1st have to be public hearings and federal and local approvals before jet is allowed to land anywhere but DC.
REPORTER: Walter Cronkite

(DC) Admin. plan allows continued flights to Dulles Airport, favors them to Kennedy International in NYC, but leaves this up to federal courts and opens way for landings in 11 other United States cities; these noted. In cities other than Washington, DC and NYC, landings would be under stricter noise rules to be set in part by local airport authorities. Trans. Secretary Brock-Adams says he wasn't pressured into decision, but there were obvious concessions to Britain and France, who have built or are building just 16 of SST's. [ADAMS - states that 16 already made or in product are only ones ruling applies to and that any future Concordes would have to meet strict noise standards. Notes there's no known technology that can meet these standards.] Representative Leo Ryan heads House environmental subcommittee and plans congress hearings aimed at making rules for Concorde tougher.
REPORTER: Nelson Benton

(Studio) Only officials in Miami, Dallas and Philadelphia have thought airports there would welcome Concorde; officials in Los Angeles and San Francisco are opposed and others are uncertain. Reactions from Britain and France cited.
REPORTER: Walter Cronkite

Reporter(s):
Benton, Nelson;
Cronkite, Walter
Duration:
00:02:10

Note to sponsor members: The Vanderbilt Television News Archive video player requires a modern operating system and browser to work properly. If you are experiencing playback problems, check the minimum requirements and adjust your setup accordingly. After adjustments, if you continue to experience problems, please contact us.

Welcome! Above is the abstract of the item that you're interested in viewing from the Vanderbilt Television News Archive's collection. You have three options if you'd like to view this item:

  • You may request a loan of this video by registering on our website and placing an order.
  • You may visit the Television News Archive on the Vanderbilt campus to view on-site from the Archive's collection.
  • If you are associated with a college or university, you may ask your library if they would like to become a sponsor, which would give students and faculty at your institution the ability to view items from our collection.

If you believe that you are associated with a sponsoring college or university and have received this message in error, please let us know.