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US-USSR Relations / Yurchenko #301125

CBS Evening News for Tuesday, Nov 05, 1985
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(Studio) Report introduced
REPORTER: Dan Rather

(DC) USSR defector Vitaly Yurchenko reported meeting with State Department today to validate his desire to return home; Yurchenko recalled claiming CIA kidnapped and drugged him, that he did not voluntarily defect. Yurchenko thought kept at CIA safehouse owned by CIA agent Clifton Strathern; details given. [Senator William COHEN - believes Yurchenko's defection was orchestrated by KGB.] [Senator Patrick LEAHY - agrees, explains.] Insignificance of Yurchenko's identification of former CIA agent Edward Howard as Soviet spy explained. [COHEN - notes KGB's perception of Howard.] Possible personal reasons for returning to USSR considered. [YURCHENKO - (thru translator) claims he was kidnapped in Rome, brought involuntarily to US.] [State Department Charles REDMAN, USSR defector Arkady SHEVCHENKO - deny such allegations.] State Department's acceptance of Yurchenko's credibility said reflected in its official protest to Kremlin regarding KGB murder of United States agent Nicholas Shadrin. [LEAHY - notes implications for State Department if Yurchenko's defection was planned by KGB.]
REPORTER: David Martin

(Moscow, USSR ) Soviet media's coverage of Yurchenko affair described; Yurchenko's possible future here, reflected by current situations of returning defectors Oleg Bitov and Svetlana Peters, discussed. Scenes shown. [Arkady SHEVCHENKO - explains Yurchenko's propaganda usefulness to USSR government] Public relations boost for Kremlin of situation noted.
REPORTER: Mark Phillips

Reporter(s):
Martin, David;
Phillips, Mark;
Rather, Dan
Duration:
00:04:40

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