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USSR / Nuclear Accident #309506

CBS Evening News for Wednesday, Apr 30, 1986
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(Studio: Dan Rather) United States and West officials said believing fire at Chernobyl, USSR , nuclear power plant is still burning and may do so for weeks; factors underlying this assessment explained, discussed. Illustrations shown. [Rand Corporation spokesperson Ken. SOLOMON - explains graphite fires.] [Graphite specialist Adam BANNER - notes inability to put out such fires.] "China syndrome" of nuclear plant explosions explained.

(DC: Susan Spencer) Short-term medical concerns and long-term implications for Soviet citizens living near Chernobyl examined. [Dr. Jack GEIGER - notes those in close proximity are just beginning their suffering.] [Dr. Zbigniew OLKOWSKI - explains effect on unborn children.] [Dr. Stanley ORDER - discusses diseases related to radiation contamination.] Implications for food and water sources of USSR and surrounding countries noted.

Reporter(s):
Rather, Dan;
Spencer, Susan
Duration:
00:03:20

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