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China-US Relations / Spy Plane Standoff #398006

CBS Evening News for Monday, Apr 09, 2001
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(Studio: Dan Rather) Report introduced.

(Pentagon: David Martin) The continuing standoff between the United States and China over an American spy plane and its 24 crew members held on Hainan Island, China, reported; satellite photos shown of the plane on Hainan Island, China; animation shown of the crash and of damage to the airplane. [US Army Brigadier General Neal SEALOCK - says he met with the crew.] [Secretary of State Colin POWELL - says the plane did violate Chinese air space when it came in to land.]

(Studio: Dan Rather) Report introduced.

(Beijing: Barry Petersen) The Chinese perspective of the China-US standoff examined; details given of the behind-the-scenes political battles in China, the first announcement in China that negotiations are in progress and Chinese complaints about changes in United States policy toward China. [President BUSH - says he expects "a prompt and safe return of the crew".] [POWELL - offers an apology.] [Qinghua University YAN Xue Tong - says Powell should have apologized at the beginning.]

(Studio: Dan Rather) Report introduced.

(White House: Bill Plante) The White House strategy in the China-US standoff examined. [BUSH - says China-US relations could be damaged.] [Former United States Ambassador to China James SASSER - says the Chinese are "hyper- sensitive".] [George Washington University David SHAMBAUGH - says public perceptions are hardening.]

(Studio: Dan Rather) Interview with Representative Henry Hyde. [HYDE - says the crew members are held against their will; says they are hostages; says Bush is walking a fine line.]

Reporter(s):
Martin, David;
Petersen, Barry;
Plante, Bill;
Rather, Dan
Duration:
00:08:50

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