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Cuba / Helms-Burton Act, Baseball, Bombings / Alarcon Interview #417778

CNN Evening News for Tuesday, Jul 15, 1997
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(Studio: Bernard Shaw) Announcement that President Clinton will waive provisions of the Helms-Burton Act, which is designed to crack down on companies doing business in Cuba, for another six months reported. Announcement by the government of Fidel Castro that the baseball tour of the United States is being canceled because of concerns about mass defections of the players reported; scenes shown of recent bombings in Havana. [State Department spokesman Nicholas BURNS - says the United States knows nothing about the explosions.]

(Studio: Bernard Shaw) Interview held with Cuba's National Assembly President Ricardo Alarcon. [ALARCON - says the State Department has not taken action to control groups that have threatened actions against Cuba; blames groups linked to the Cuban-American community in Florida; comments on the suspension of the baseball tour and on the agreement with the United States on immigration; wants the United States to repeal the Helms-Burton Law; talks about Pope John Paul II's visit to Cuba early next year; says the bombings were an attempt at hurting Cuba's tourist business.]

Reporter(s):
Shaw, Bernard
Duration:
00:08:10

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