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Teacher Strike / New York City / Issue #442259

NBC Evening News for Monday, Sep 09, 1968
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(Studio) New York City teachers strike for 2nd year 50,000 of 1 million students show up. This year issue not concerned with pay, but with Mayor John Lindsay's plan to decentralize school districts and turn control to 33 local school bds.
REPORTER: Chet Huntley

(NYC) May, 1968, film shown. 1st decentralization attempt began in Brooklyn area. Group of teachers fired and local board refused to let them in school. Lindsay and others felt plan would improve ghetto schools by letting them pick teachers best suited to their needs. August, 1968, film shown. Bd. of education and teacher's union fought concept of mtgs. held all summer. Union says local bds. would undermine union contracts. Union insists some teachers be reinstated, but Brooklyn board refuses. [District Admin. Rhody MCCOY - says Mr. Shanker feels we're defying union authority by keeping teachers out.] [Union President Albert SHANKER - says group trying to take out frustrations on teachers.] [MCCOY - says once negative aspects of education known, changes will be made.] [SHANKER - dealing with national situation. No teacher free to do anything if can be forced out after declared innocent.] Teachers strike. Brooklyn school kept open with non-union teachers. 90% schools closed. Union argues decentralization threat to job security.
REPORTER: Sidney Lazard

Reporter(s):
Huntley, Chet;
Lazard, Sidney
Duration:
00:03:30

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