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Food Controversy / MSG / Finch #443051

NBC Evening News for Monday, Oct 27, 1969
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(Studio) Food retailers appeal to President for "gentleness" in banning products from grocery shelves. Independent Food Retailers say not fair to create impression cyclamate distributors or mfrs. responsible for original mistake. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) manufacturer defends product.
REPORTER: Chet Huntley

(DC) International Minerals and Chemical Corporation makes 60% MSG. Company claims MSG safe. [Ind. Scientist Dr. Andrew EBERT - says product safe when used as food enhancer.]
REPORTER: Paul Friedman

(No Location Given) [Biochemist Dr. Bernard OSER - tells how MSG exists in body. MSG shouldn't have been removed from baby food.]
REPORTER: Liz Trotta

(Saint Louis, Missouri) [Washington University Dr. John OLNEY - says MSG fed to mice, not injected, causes brain damage. Dose comparable to that in baby food. True there's natural glutamates in proteins of food. Glutamate can't be released until protein digested. Doses put right in blood stream causes brain damage in infant animals.]
REPORTER: Chris Condon KSD-TV

(DC) Senators George McGovern and Gaylord Nelson want FDA (Food and Drug Administration) to throw out lists of "general recognized as safe" and do tests to find out for sure. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has said it lacks money and time to do necessary research.
REPORTER: Paul Friedman

(Studio) Department of Health, Education and Welfare Secretary Robert Finch says government should establish tolerance, so public could be warned, and drugs wouldn't have to be pulled off market arbitrarily.
REPORTER: Chet Huntley

Reporter(s):
Friedman, Paul;
Huntley, Chet;
Trotta, Liz
Duration:
00:05:20

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