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Anti-Ballistic Missile System / Senate Opposition #444467

NBC Evening News for Tuesday, Feb 04, 1969
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(Studio) Several Senators speak heatedly about Sentinel missile system; say it's too costly; dangerous to those living near it; only would continue arms race with USSR . $700 million in Johnson budget to go for 20 missile sites in United States which are supposed to knock down Red Chinese missiles; 1/2 Senator opposes sites.
REPORTER: David Brinkley

(Studio) Opposition to missile sites exists in Boston, Chicago, Seattle, Detroit, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. Albany, Georgia and Great Falls, MT residents pleased with idea of bigger local payrolls and compete to be Sentinel sites. Senator fears that Sentinel systems will lead to anti- Russian system. Senator John Sherman Cooper gathered opposition to missile system last year
REPORTER: John Chancellor

(DC) [Senator William FULBRIGHT - says Congress can refuse money for construction. [Senator John South COOPER - asserts that negotiations can make more progress if anti-ballistic missile system rescinded.] [Senator Albert GORE - feels debate will have effect on Senator
REPORTER: No reporter given

(Studio) Senate leaders Mike Mansfield and Edward Kennedy oppose system.
REPORTER: John Chancellor

Reporter(s):
Brinkley, David;
Chancellor, John
Duration:
00:03:40

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