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Air Traffic Controllers #446693

NBC Evening News for Thursday, Jul 03, 1969
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(Studio) 2 weeks ago air traffic snarled when air traffic controllers stayed out. Back, but claim airports overcrowded and unsafe.
REPORTER: David Brinkley

(Islip, New York) Regional Control Center handles all traffic at New York airports. Slowdown causes delay. In past, controllers bent guidelines; no longer do this. Workers want better equipment and more workers.
REPORTER: Liz Trotta

(Chicago, Illinois) Psychiatrist Dr. Wayne Sands retained by Prof. Air Controllers Association, studies O'Hare Airport workers. [SANDS - says men drained by critical split-second decisions. Stress level high. Hearing decreases. Men speak of fatigue, insomnia, and dreams.] Federal Aviation Administration thinks pressure not severe. [Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson Oscar BAKKE - says incidents few. Controllers show few breakdowns under pressure. They respond well to challenge.] [SANDS - says some only think of radar movements as blips; others people.] FAA denies controller's stalling charges. Says sent recommendations to Congress
REPORTER: Liz Trotta

Reporter(s):
Brinkley, David;
Trotta, Liz
Duration:
00:05:50

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