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Earth Day / Daughters of The American Revolution / Blacks / South Dakota #450830

NBC Evening News for Thursday, Apr 23, 1970
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(Studio) Earth Day huge success; millions oppose pollution; Daughters of the American Revolution calls it subversive movement; few blacks took part.
REPORTER: Chet Huntley

(Chicago, Illinois) Urban blacks worried about survival in city more than environment outside. [Unidentified BLACKS - say blacks have too many other problems to join pollution marches; environmental fight detracts from war on poverty.]
REPORTER: John Evans

(DC) Howard University students ignore Earth Day. [Michael HARRIS - thinks Earth Day political move to divert attention from human problems.] [Gary AYERS - says those who created Earth Day not concerned about ghetto problems.] [HARRIS - says white liberals try to exploit blacks.] [AYERS - says lack of human rights funds demonstrates how pols. feel about blacks.]
REPORTER: Lem Tucker

(Studio) Most Earth Day participants from big cities, U's.; rural people ignored it.
REPORTER: Chet Huntley

(South Dakota) Rural state; population decring.; agriculture chief industry and polluter; feed trough runs, fertilizers and junk piles mar landscape [Cattleman Al BARNES - says consumer must pay for clean up.] People take clean air and land for granted.
REPORTER: Tom Brokaw

Reporter(s):
Brokaw, Tom;
Evans, John;
Huntley, Chet;
Tucker, Lem
Duration:
00:07:00

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