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Drug Abuse / PCP #46156

ABC Evening News for Friday, Oct 14, 1977
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(Studio) Chemical PCP, or angel dust, has replaced amphetamines, or speed, as most dangerous new drug fad among nation's youth.
REPORTER: Barbara Walters

(NYC) Drug has spread from California to become one of most widely abused drugs in such scattered cities as Philadelphia, Minneapolis, San Francisco, Chicago, Detroit and NYC. Result is that many youths are overdosing on drug whose dangers they don't really understand. Los Angeles police have made over 1400 arrests of student pushers and haven't begun to make dent in number. [Los Angeles police spokesperson William HOCOMB - notes problem is that drug can be made in home labs, and getting it is no problem for kids.] Dr. Diane Sixsmith is head of emergency room at Harlem Hospital in NYC. [SIXSMITH - has had 6 overdose cases in last 3 days. Cites dangers in drug, include brain damage and schizophrenia.] Chemicals used to make PCP are essentially unregulated, uncontrolled and available.
REPORTER: Geraldo Rivera

Reporter(s):
Rivera, Geraldo;
Walters, Barbara
Duration:
00:02:20

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