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South Korea Influence Probe / Ethics Committee Public Hearings #46206

ABC Evening News for Wednesday, Oct 19, 1977
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(Studio) Public hearings on South Korean influence scandal begin.
REPORTER: Tom Jarriel

(DC) [House Ethics Committee chairperson John FLYNT - says committee believes there's sufficient evidence, to be developed at hearings, to show efforts were made by government of South Korea to influence Congmen. through money and gifts, and also that further and intensified efforts to determine which members of Congress received it are more than warranted.] Committee reserves for later hearings task of disclosing which representatives received what from South Koreans, but 1st witness today takes scandal into halls of Congress; is Nan Elder, who was long-time secretary to Representative Larry Winn. Ms. Elder tells of visit to Winn's office by Korean diplomat who was cntry.'s ambassador in 1972; details of testimony noted. [ELDER - told Winn it was more money than she'd ever seen and he told her to give it back or get rid of it. Describes stack of $100 bills.] Next to testify is former Korean official Jai Hyon Lee. [LEE - discovered Korean ambassador stuffing money into white envelopes one day in 1973; describes incident.] Both Americans and South Korean government watch congress proceedings in case; South Korea's cooperation is needed.
REPORTER: Brit Hume Artist: Freda Reiter

Reporter(s):
Hume, Brit;
Jarriel, Tom
Duration:
00:02:50

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