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Mideast #462983

NBC Evening News for Wednesday, Mar 15, 1972
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(Studio) King Hussein of Jordan proposes-establishment of 2 semi-autonomous sections of Jordan: 1 part Bedouin Arabs E. of Jordan River, 1 part Palestinian Arabs West of Jordan River Amman would be capitol of federation. Israel says plan creates obstacles, but says peace talks can begin at any time.
REPORTER: John Chancellor

(Amman, Jordan) King Hussein invites Jordanian leaders to palace to hear his proposal. Plan depends on Israel moving troops from West Jordan. [HUSSEIN - speaks of emergence of plans for future to organize home guaranteeing rights of all.]
REPORTER: Richard Hunt

(Jericho, Jordan) In Israeli-occupied Jordan, Palestinian leaders skeptical of empty promises, saying plan announced to detract from West bank municipal elections where 100 candidates challenge old pro-Hussein leadership [Candidate for mayor, Daoud SALAH - wants Palestinian people to have own government, completely independent. (Nablus, Jordan) In another West bank city, political leaders complain Hussein did not consult with them about plan. Many prefer Israeli occupation to Hussein, since his crackdown on guerrillas. [Political organizer, Mrs. Rymonda TAWIL - says no one likes occupation but it is preferred to old regime.] West bankers suspect king has made deal with Israel.
REPORTER: David Burrington

(Studio) King Hussein plans to visit Washington, DC this month. He may also visit England, France, and Russia, to urge acceptance of plan.

Reporter(s):
Burrington, David;
Chancellor, John;
Hunt, Richard
Duration:
00:05:10

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