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Vietnam / Results American Involvement #468876

NBC Evening News for Sunday, Feb 25, 1973
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(Studio) 13,000 American servicemen remain in Vietnam. Will be out in 8 weeks Ron Nessen reviews American action in Vietnam war.
REPORTER: Garrick Utley

(Saigon, South Vietnam) Town of Ben Tre occupied by Viet Cong during 1968 Tet offensive. US and South Vietnam attacked. United States ofr. quoted as saying town destroyed in order to be saved. Ben Tre rebuilt now, but ofr.'s remark could be epitaph of entire American war effort. Much of South Vietnam destroyed in order to be saved for South Vietnam government Whole towns, such as Quang Tri, An Loc, parts of Hue and others totally razed. United States dropped more than 15 billion pounds bombs on Vietnam, leaving more than 21 million bomb craters. Farm land ruined. Forests destroyed. Ecology may be permanently damaged. Cntryside once serene and lovely. Saigon now overpopulated with refugees from country and others. Many in South Vietnam made fortune off war. Culture debased. Social structure disrupted. 6 million refugees created by war. 415,000 civilians killed during war; 1 million wounded. Many people, include children, maimed by napalm. Hospitals inadequate. Of all results of war, orphaned children most pathetic. American servicemen fathers of at least 10,000 orphans. Half-American children treated as out-' casts. United States says American involvement has resulted in chance for South Vietnam to determine its own future without interference from North Vietnam. Whether this goal worth the price remains at question.
REPORTER: Ron Nessen

Reporter(s):
Nessen, Ron;
Utley, Garrick
Duration:
00:08:30

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