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Health Services Bill / Veto Upheld / Effects #472531

NBC Evening News for Wednesday, Sep 12, 1973
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(Studio) House sustains veto of health services bill. Congress seems to be more behind President than anticipated.
REPORTER: John Chancellor

(Capitol Hill) Republicans feel veto is morale booster. [Representative Gerald FORD - believes Congress to unify and overcome Watergate stigma.] [Representative Paul ROGERS - disagrees with Ford. Believes majority wanted bill for American people.]
REPORTER: Ray Scherer

(Baltimore, Maryland) Hospital set up for free care to servicemen to close after House upheld President' veto. [Hospital director Dr. K.K. WONG - questions superior with regard to future plans.] Dr. Wong operates hospital under court injunction. [Patient Mrs. Patricia McGANN - worries about hospital closure.] [Merchant seaman Anthony RUSSO - believes hospital definitely serves veterans.] Cancer research goes on in hospital; research to be delayed after hospital closes. Someone must pay for patients to be sent elsewhere.
REPORTER: Ron Nessen

(Studio) Emergency medical service to be slowed by House upholding President' veto.
REPORTER: John Chancellor

(Chicago, Illinois) Trauma ctrs. set up to handle acute emergencies. Highway traffic accident victims decrd. 8% in 1st year of operation; all emergencies handled here now. [Program director Dr. David BOYD - believes Illinois has best emergency medical care available in US.] Veto means trauma ctrs. must cut back and other states' hopes for trauma ctrs. dashed.
REPORTER: Bob Jamieson

Reporter(s):
Chancellor, John;
Jamieson, Bob;
Nessen, Ron;
Scherer, Ray
Duration:
00:05:20

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