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Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (Salt) II / Details #487054

NBC Evening News for Friday, Feb 13, 1976
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(Studio) Report on Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) II from NBC's new national security reporter who was diplomatic reporter for "Washington Post."
REPORTER: John Chancellor

(Studio) Diplomats can't keep up with scientists. In 1972, United States accepted limit of 1054 ICBMs and 656 sub missiles. USSR could have 1618 ICBMs and 740 sub missiles. USSR had more subs and missiles; United States had more nuclear warhds. and bombers. Agreement had too many loopholes; it didn't say anything about effectiveness or size of weapons. Then, MIRVs were developed and perfected.
REPORTER: Marilyn Berger

(Vladivostok, USSR ) November 1974 film shown. Limit of 2400 placed on delivery systems here. Of these, 1320 could carry multiple warhds. or MIRVs. [Secretary of State Henry KISSINGER - says issues before us now are technical.] 2 new weapons caused trouble: Soviet backfire bomber and American cruise missile. Both described.
REPORTER: Marilyn Berger

(Moscow, USSR ) January `76 film shown. Kissinger visits Moscow to work out agreement with regard to new weapons. Compromises emerge.
REPORTER: Marilyn Berger

(Studio) Kissinger hopes to give Moscow some answers in next 2 weeks National Security Council met Wednesday and Kissinger meets today with Soviet ambassador Anatoly Dobrynin.
REPORTER: Marilyn Berger

(Studio) Reporter suggests Kissinger and Dobrynin talked about Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT). If deal can't be reached before July convs., Ford probably can't reach deal.
REPORTER: John Chancellor; Marilyn Berger

Reporter(s):
Berger, Marilyn;
Chancellor, John
Duration:
00:05:00

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