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California / Education Discrimination / Intelligence Quotient Tests #490843

NBC Evening News for Tuesday, Oct 11, 1977
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(Studio) Lawsuit has been filed in California, saying intelligence quotient tests discriminate against blacks because they don't take into account cultural experiences of black people.
REPORTER: John Chancellor

(San Francisco, California) California has routinely used intelligence quotient tests to find children who should be put into classes for mentally retarded. For years, rate of blacks was higher than wts. Case now in court was filed on behalf of black students judged mentally retarded in 1971, placed in spec. classes, and later examined by black psychiatrists and found to be normal. Suit is filed against California department of education. [Students' attorney Armando MENOCAL - states his case that intelligence quotient tests are biased against blacks, have long been known to be so and California shouldn't be using them.] Trial could go on for mos.; 1st witness for plaintiffs is San Francisco State University dean of school of education, Asa Hilliard. [HILLIARD - says if one wants to learn state of child's intelligence, child should be tested in language he's familiar with and experiences he's had. Notes standardized question doesn't do this.] State had considered using argument of heredity of blacks on its side, but now says it will argue that poor pre and postnatal health care may be reason for higher rate of blacks than wts. in mentally retarded classes.
REPORTER: Don Oliver Unsigned Sketches

Reporter(s):
Chancellor, John;
Oliver, Don
Duration:
00:02:20

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