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Carter / Energy Plan / Gasoline Tax / Europe #493231

NBC Evening News for Thursday, Apr 21, 1977
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(Studio) Carter energy plan means changes in way Americans live. Reports will examine various aspects of plan, its results and reactions to it.
REPORTER: David Brinkley

(Studio) Details of gasoline tax proposal noted.
REPORTER: John Chancellor

(Burbank, California) Reporter notes large amount of gasoline used in California and reactions of people to proposed tax.
REPORTER: Frank Bourgholtzer

(Studio) Anchor asks with regard to consequences of gas tax to city like Los Angeles.
REPORTER: David Brinkley

(Burbank, California) People here seem to feel they'll still have to use cars and pay for it, but may be unfair to those who have to drive a lot. [MAN - says he can't afford increase in gas price and doesn't believe others can.]
REPORTER: Frank Bourgholtzer

(Studio) Anchor asks if California state government has made any official statements.
REPORTER: John Chancellor

(Burbank, California) Comments of Los Angeles mayor noted.
REPORTER: Frank Bourgholtzer

(Studio) Europeans' use of great deal less energy than Americans noted; prices there higher also. Anchor asks London reporter about European living with energy situation and reaction to Carter plan.
REPORTER: David Brinkley

(London, England) Gasoline prices in Britain, West Germany, France and Italy noted. Because gas prices have always been higher than in US, Americans won't get much sympathy from Europe.
REPORTER: Garrick Utley

(Studio) Anchor compares United States and West German standards of living, but notes in m.p.g., Germans get average of 27 and Americans get only 13.
REPORTER: John Chancellor

(London, England) Reporter notes drivers in Europe use Fiats, Volkswagens and Minis and expect to get 25-30 m.p.g. minimum.
REPORTER: Garrick Utley

(Studio) There's disagreement in Senate with regard to probability of energy bill passage this year
REPORTER: John Chancellor

(DC) General feeling is package will go thru; Howard Baker's statement that it might not by end of year refers to adjournment deadline. Representative Barber Conable, Ways and Means Committee mbr., says he believes energy bill will go thru by year's end.
REPORTER: Catherine Mackin

(Studio) Anchor notes most opposition is to gas tax.
REPORTER: David Brinkley

(DC) Reporter agrees; notes even most supportive mbr., speaker Tip O'Neill, says it will die. Reason is that public will actually feel tax, will want to take it out on someone and Congmen. up for reelection are most available and likely.
REPORTER: Catherine Mackin

(Studio) O'Neill plans to forego use of limo and get small car. Further reports to come.
REPORTER: David Brinkley

Reporter(s):
Bourgholtzer, Frank;
Brinkley, David;
Chancellor, John;
Mackin, Catherine;
Utley, Garrick
Duration:
00:07:30

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