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Segment 3 (Radiation Safety) #497772

NBC Evening News for Wednesday, Feb 08, 1978
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(Studio) Continuing controversy with regard to safe levels of radiation stated. Special concerns of those working in nuclear plants noted.
REPORTER: David Brinkley

(No location given) History of nuclear plant at Hanford, WA, given, incl. making plutonium for 1st atomic bomb, used in World War II. Is noted that levels of radiation at Hanford plant considered safe until 1974 reports of WA public health service Dr. Sam Milham. Details with regard to Milham's research given. [MILHAM - describes relationship between men who lived and worked at Hanford and certain types of death causes.] Govt. study of Hanford safety, headed by Dr. Thomas Mancuso, mentioned, include Mancuso's claim of being fired because he found same results as Milham. Congress hearing on issue reported [MANCUSO - says there's increase in relationship between radiation and cancer and that limits with regard to standards of safety should be lowered.] Energy Department conflicting report cited. [Department spokesperson James LIVERMAN - believes that current information shows present safety levels of radiation are adequate for protection of workers and public.] Safety precautions taken at Hanford plant described. [Retiring worker Elmer BEST - has never been afraid of radiation at plant.]
REPORTER: Rick Davis

(Studio) Update on earlier Segment 3 report with regard to nuclear tests of 1950's, involving participation of Army troops. Govt. attempts to locate those involved in tests in Nevada in 1950's noted. Phone numbers to call for info. given and shown.
REPORTER: David Brinkley

Reporter(s):
Brinkley, David;
Davis, Rick
Duration:
00:05:50

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