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Insider's Report (Merchants of Death) (Part I) #601571

NBC Evening News for Tuesday, Aug 30, 1994
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(Studio: Stone Phillips) Report introduced.

(Pentagon: Ed Rabel) The role of the United States in the Third World arms market examined; scenes shown of F-16 fighter bombers sold, but unshipped, to Pakistan for fear they could be used to drop atomic weapons. [Pakistani air attache Commodore Shahid JAVED, Senator Larry PRESSLER - comment on the time when Pakistan almost bombed nuclear facilities in India.] [Congressional Research Studies Richard GRIMMETT - says the United States is the top arms seller.] Incidents in which arms sold by the United States were used against American soldiers reviewed. [World Policy Institution William HARTUNG - comments.] The importance of overseas sales to the troubled aerospace industry explained; statistics on Third World financial debt to the United States cited. [PaineWebber Jack MODZELEWSKI - cites profitability.] [Aerospace Industrial Association Joel JOHNSON - comments.] The ethical questions raised as to whether America should be the world's leading Merchant of Death.

Reporter(s):
Phillips, Stone;
Rabel, Ed
Duration:
00:04:00

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