Search the Archive

Teenage Drivers / SUVs & Safety / Brains / Tracking #788914

CNN Evening News for Tuesday, May 03, 2005
View other clips in this broadcast →

Material supplied by VTNA may be used for educational analysis or research only. Any editing, reproduction, publication, rebroadcast, public showing or public display may be prohibited by copyright laws.

(Studio: Aaron Brown) Insurance Inst. for Highway Safety statistics on teens & car accidents cited.

(Odessa, Texas: Randi Kaye) The issue of SUV safety examined; details given about one Texas teenager's rollover in her sport utility vehicle; scenes shown of the wrecked car & from the site of crash. [SUV rollover survivor Amanda VICKERY†- describes her SUV, her car accident & why she was wearing her seat belt.]

(Studio: Aaron Brown) "Consumer Reports" magazine recommendations of the safest cars for teens outlined on screen.

(Philadelphia: Elizabeth Cohen) The issue of what goes on in the brain of a teenage driver examined; video shown of a high-speed chase on a country road in Maine that ends in a rollover crash; details given {with diagrams} about National Insts. of Health research on the teen brain. [Temple University Dr. Laurence STEINBERG†- says changes in the brain at puberty make us want to take more risk.] Steinberg's experiments with teens & distraction shown.

(Studio: Aaron Brown) How parents track teens using technology examined; scenes shown to illustrate how the tracking system works for one family. [Parents John & Trudy JACOBSON†- talk about an "electronic fence" around their son & controlling his driving.] [Teenager Joe JACOBSON†- calls the tracking "a pain"; admits he does slow down.]

Reporter(s):
Brown, Aaron;
Kaye, Randi;
Cohen, Elizabeth
Duration:
00:13:10

Note to sponsor members: The Vanderbilt Television News Archive video player requires a modern operating system and browser to work properly. If you are experiencing playback problems, check the minimum requirements and adjust your setup accordingly. After adjustments, if you continue to experience problems, please contact us.

Welcome! Above is the abstract of the item that you're interested in viewing from the Vanderbilt Television News Archive's collection. You have three options if you'd like to view this item:

  • You may request a loan of this video by registering on our website and placing an order.
  • You may visit the Television News Archive on the Vanderbilt campus to view on-site from the Archive's collection.
  • If you are associated with a college or university, you may ask your library if they would like to become a sponsor, which would give students and faculty at your institution the ability to view items from our collection.

If you believe that you are associated with a sponsoring college or university and have received this message in error, please let us know.